How grim was Britain in 1979? A view from the late boxer Errol Christie


Very grim according to veteran 1980s boxer Errol Christie. I filmed Errol in the boxing ring at Gymbox in Holborn talking about his memories of racism, street violence and fascist thuggery. Below is the great man’s perspective on 1979.

Sadly, Errol died of lung cancer in 2017 having never smoked in his life. But he always complained to me of having to box as a youth in smoke filled halls and driving around in a van where everybody was puffing away. He was only three weeks younger than me and it’s a terrible loss to all his friends and his family.

Pauline Black and The Selecter


Pauline Black – I had the honour of meeting the queen of ska five years ago when I was writing Neville Staple’s biography and she wasn’t a disappointment. Since then, I’ve had several encounters and she’s a truly amazing and very nice woman.

Luckily for all of you – The Selecter is touring again and they’re as good as ever. So get some tickets. Pauline has also brought out her biography – Black By Design, which is doing a roaring trade.

Here she is on the front cover of Record Mirror – thirty years ago.

Neville Staple at a book signing in 2009 for Original Rude Boy


Having worked with Neville Staple on his biography – Original Rude Boy – it was time to take it out on the road. Nev did a whole series of book signings around 2009 and since, which proved to be very popular. Seem to recall that at Fopp near Soho, London – Danny Boyle showed up….which was a bit unexpected. 

Neville Staple biography reviewed in the Huffington Post


Screen Shot 2018-03-16 at 22.42.18In 2011, the paperback of my biography of Neville Staple was published by Aurum Press. I’d spent countless hours with Neville and also many of his close friends to write Original Rude Boy.

This had involved popping up to Coventry and sitting with Nev in his living room reliving the glory days of 2Tone but also discussing his youth and friendships. I found that Neville was very passionate about his family, especially those in Jamaica he had been forced to leave behind as a child – including his own mother.

I think it’s fair to say that Neville has a Jamaican soul. Though he’s also a Coventry lad and has led a life in music that has taken him all over the world. But he has never forgotten his roots and crucially those people who were always there in the good times and the bad. In that respect, one would have to single out Trevor and Rex, childhood buddies who went on to tour with The Specials – officially as roadies but a bit more than that.

Together with Neville, Trevor and Rex brought a black British street-wise sense to The Specials. This was something Bernie Rhodes understood was essential during his short time managing the band. This trio gave The Specials a flavour that set it apart from other 2Tone offerings.

Though of course, one cannot ignore the towering genius of Jerry Dammers. He had recognised in the old ska sound from Jamaica something that could speak to young people at the end of the 70s. They were tough times. Unemployment was high, poverty was increasing and hope was giving way to frustration and despair.

Jerry’s interpretation of ska with Neville’s ability to “toast” about the realities of everyday life in the decaying auto city that was Coventry was an incredible combination. Hope I helped to capture this in the book. Speaking to Huffington Post journalist Salvatore Bono, Neville said some kind words about yours truly.

He knows how to talk to people, knew how to talk to me. And I want to do a follow up about the touring with the Specials and stuff we left out before – and he’s the man because he knows what I’m like.

You can read the full review HERE on the HuffPo.